People

Moving Forward

By January 18, 2019 May 21st, 2019 No Comments

In a way, life is like a roller coaster – full of unexpected turns, exhilarating ups and devastating downs. Before we know it, the ride is over. We have to get off the roller coaster, even if we don’t want to, whilst the train rolls on. Similarly, we will die one day and the world will move on, arguably as if we were never there in the first place. 

I remember when my grandpa died it felt so incredibly surreal. I could not comprehend how the world just kept turning. After all, someone I loved dearly had died. I recall going to a lake with some friends a few days after my grandpa’s death. I found myself having a good time and enjoying my friends’ company, which left me utterly confused: How could I enjoy being at the lake with friends when something so awful and inherently sad had happened just a few days earlier? Was I not supposed to be sad? Strangely enough, the world was still giving me several things to be grateful for that day: my friends’ support and good weather among other things. I was happy and sad at the same time. 

The world certainly didn’t wait for me to stop mourning, instead it just went on. While at times disorienting, I must say I am glad the world did not stop turning just because my grandpa died. It prevented me from getting lost in my grief. Maybe the idea that life goes on can thus be somewhat comforting. It allows us to go on as well. With time we might get used to the idea of someone being gone, and it is because time keeps going that we can keep going. Without time we would not be able to move forward.

At the same time, the idea of the world constantly moving on from the dead is scary. It means the world won’t stop moving when we die, either. It also implies that at some point in time we may be forgotten. It hurts to realize that I sometimes struggle to remember my grandfather’s voice. Maybe it’s just time doing its job, but it is painful, nevertheless. However, if the world does keep turning and memories do fade, that begs the question: How do I want people to remember me? What if I am forgotten? Or better yet, do I even want the world to move on after I am gone? 

I strongly believe it is important to try to leave this world knowing you did something to leave a positive mark. Life will be over before you know it. Although I might not remember my grandpa’s voice, he is not forgotten. I remember his fondness for me, and our car rides together exploring the Veluwe (a nature reserve in the Netherlands). He left his mark.

Personally, I would like to be remembered as someone who fought for equality. I strive to make the world a better, more equal place. Maybe my reasons are selfish, but I feel that when a loved one dies, we have no choice but to move on in due course. If we do not move on with our lives and instead stand still, our potential will be lost. I would say that if we miss out on the world, the world will miss out on us in a similar way. It will be an opportunity lost to leave behind a legacy that matters and lives on, and thus become literally larger than life. Yes, the world will keep on moving when we die, but the real question is: Can we make the world move? 

In a way, life is like a roller coaster – full of unexpected turns, exhilarating ups and devastating downs. Before we know it, the ride is over. We have to get off the roller coaster, even if we don’t want to, whilst the train rolls on. Similarly, we will die one day and the world will move on, arguably as if we were never there in the first place. 

I remember when my grandpa died it felt so incredibly surreal. I could not comprehend how the world just kept turning. After all, someone I loved dearly had died. I recall going to a lake with some friends a few days after my grandpa’s death. I found myself having a good time and enjoying my friends’ company, which left me utterly confused: How could I enjoy being at the lake with friends when something so awful and inherently sad had happened just a few days earlier? Was I not supposed to be sad? Strangely enough, the world was still giving me several things to be grateful for that day: my friends’ support and good weather among other things. I was happy and sad at the same time. 

The world certainly didn’t wait for me to stop mourning, instead it just went on. While at times disorienting, I must say I am glad the world did not stop turning just because my grandpa died. It prevented me from getting lost in my grief. Maybe the idea that life goes on can thus be somewhat comforting. It allows us to go on as well. With time we might get used to the idea of someone being gone, and it is because time keeps going that we can keep going. Without time we would not be able to move forward.

At the same time, the idea of the world constantly moving on from the dead is scary. It means the world won’t stop moving when we die, either. It also implies that at some point in time we may be forgotten. It hurts to realize that I sometimes struggle to remember my grandfather’s voice. Maybe it’s just time doing its job, but it is painful, nevertheless. However, if the world does keep turning and memories do fade, that begs the question: How do I want people to remember me? What if I am forgotten? Or better yet, do I even want the world to move on after I am gone? 

I strongly believe it is important to try to leave this world knowing you did something to leave a positive mark. Life will be over before you know it. Although I might not remember my grandpa’s voice, he is not forgotten. I remember his fondness for me, and our car rides together exploring the Veluwe (a nature reserve in the Netherlands). He left his mark.

Personally, I would like to be remembered as someone who fought for equality. I strive to make the world a better, more equal place. Maybe my reasons are selfish, but I feel that when a loved one dies, we have no choice but to move on in due course. If we do not move on with our lives and instead stand still, our potential will be lost. I would say that if we miss out on the world, the world will miss out on us in a similar way. It will be an opportunity lost to leave behind a legacy that matters and lives on, and thus become literally larger than life. Yes, the world will keep on moving when we die, but the real question is: Can we make the world move? 

Martin Verloop

Author Martin Verloop

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